This post focuses on the self-propelled guns developed from the T-100 project; with a focus on the SU-100Y.

The SU-100Y at the  Kubinka Tank Museum in Russia.

The SU-100Y at the Kubinka Tank Museum in Russia.

A profile view showing the T-100X (SU-100X), SU-100Y, and Object 103 (Obyekt 103).

A profile view showing the T-100X (SU-100X), SU-100Y, and Object 103 (Obyekt 103). This image mistakenly notes the SU-100Y as being used during the Winter War; this image courtesy of juniourgeneral.org.

Based on the T-100  (“SU-100Y Self-Propelled Gun.”), a prototype tank design which began it’s life sometime between 1938 and 1939 (“T-100 tank.”), the SU-100Y was a prototype tank destroyer. Development began in 1939 with the Winter War already being fought between the Soviet Union and Finland (“SU-100Y Self-Propelled Gun.”). The T-100 and the SU-100Y both only made it to the prototype stage; with the T-100 seeing action during the Winter War (“T-100 tank.”) and the SU-100Y serving during the defense of Moscow (“SU-100Y Self-Propelled Gun.”). Initial design requirements for the what would end up being the SU-100Y included the vehicle having qualities of a bridge laying, explosives transport, and tank recovery unit (“SU-100Y Self-Propelled Gun.”) . Although the T-100 had effectively been passed in favor of the KV given the poor performance of the T-100 and the SMK (a competitor to the T-100) during the war in Finland; work continued on existing proposals to enhance both (Zaloga and Grandsen 118). A request by Kirill Afanasievich Meretskov, commander of the Soviet 7th Army in Finland was made to use a larger gun on the heavy tanks to be used against bunkers and anti-tank obstacles among other things (Zaloga and Grandsen 118). A 152mm cannon was suggested however this was dropped in favor of using a 100mm or 130mm cannon (“SU-100Y Self-Propelled Gun.”). The initial design was given the designation T-100X and was accepted on January 8, 1940. The T-100X fielded a 130 mm Naval Gun B-13 as it’s main armament and used a torsion bar suspension. A redesign modifying the fighting compartment to reduce manufacturing times resulted in the SU-100Y (or T-100Y) (Potapov). Production of the prototype began on March 1, 1940 with the factory having received the hull (Potapov), and testing began on the 14th of the same month (“SU-100Y Self-Propelled Gun.”); this SU-100Y was actually built from a rebuilt T-100 prototype (Zaloga and Grandsen 118). In April 1940 a proposal for another T-100 based vehicle was made; this one called Object 103 (Obyekt 103) and featured a 130 mm Naval Gun B-13 as it’s main armament in a rotating turret along with three 7.62mm machine guns (“SU-100Y Self-Propelled Gun.”). Object 103 never went beyond the drawing board. Although the SU-100Y has the appearance and characteristics of a tank destroyer, it is sometimes referred to as a self-propelled gun; in fact, during the defense of Moscow it served with an Independent Artillery Division for Special Duties (“SU-100Y Self-Propelled Gun.”).

The SU-100Y is available as a premium tank (for purchase) in the Video Game World of Tanks.

The SU-100Y as seen from the tech screen in World of Tanks.

The SU-100Y as seen from the tech screen in World of Tanks.

Works Cited:

1. “SU-100Y Self-Propelled Gun.” Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia. Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., 24 Apr 2013. Web. 12 Jun 2013. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SU-100Y_Self-Propelled_Gun>.

2. “T-100 tank.” Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia. Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., 5 Jun 2013. Web. 12 Jun 2013. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/T-100_tank>.

3. “SU-100Y.” World of Tanks. Wargaming.net, 12 Jun 2013. Web. 15 Jun 2013. <http://wiki.worldoftanks.com/SU-100Y>.

4. Potapov, Valeri. “SU-100Y Self-Propelled Gun.” The Russian Battlefield. N.p., 18 Sep 2011. Web. 15 Jun 2013. <http://english.battlefield.ru/su-100y.html>.

5. Zaloga , Steven J., and James Grandsen. Soviet Tanks and Combat Vehicles of World War Two. Arms and Armour Press, 1984. 118. Print.